A Common Calvinistic Weakness

Have you ever met a Calvinist? Well, in the first place, what is a Calvinist?  It would take a lot of words to define what a Calvinist is.  But here is a funny definition.  A Calvinist is someone who is an unconditionally elect lover of books and theological thought.

In other words, one of his weaknesses as I said in an earlier blog is: love for books.  Here is the typical one:  I was requested by a brother who is groomed by the Lord for ministry to buy books for him.  I bought him the best books I can find in the conference and here is my top pick:

Honestly, as I read it, I am so tempted not to give it, hehehe… This material is so good.  Oftentimes, when you are exposed to the theology of the Cross, you think you know enough already.  This book belies that.  Even if you know so much of the Cross, the essays here provoke deep thought and rethinking that if you are alive, there would be inevitably fresh insights.  Like fresh blood oozing out of your hands if you pierce nails thru them.

Here are partial blurbs of it:

“Here is vintage J. I. Packer accompanied by some younger friends. The magisterial but too-little-known essay ‘What Did the Cross Achieve?’ is itself worth the price of the whole book. And there is much more besides. Here, then, are gospel riches, and In My Place Condemned He Stood marks the spot where the buried treasure lies. Start digging!”
Sinclair B. Ferguson, Senior Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina

“The essays in this volume by Packer and Dever are some of the most important things I have ever read. If you want to preach in such a way that results in real conversions and changed lives, you should master the approach to the cross laid out in this book.”
Tim Keller, Senior Pastor, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City

“This book contains some of the finest essays that have ever been written on the death of Christ.”
David F. Wells, Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

“Every student and pastor should own this volume, for the contents are so precious that they deserve more than one reading.”
Thomas R. Schreiner, Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

“Writing with the precision of learned theologians and the passion of forgiven sinners, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever explain the meaning of atonement, substitution, and propitiation-not just as words, but as saving benefits we can only receive from a crucified Savior.”
Philip Graham Ryken, Senior Minister, Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia

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