Free Classic Christian Audio Books to Download this March 2010

Download – christianaudio.com

I really suggest you make the above download this month of March 2010.  Hurry for you may miss this FREE OFFER.

Click for a FREE Audio Link

When I’m in a long drive, I make it a point to listen to audio books.  It makes those awake moments worthwhile.  Driving is tiring but filling the time it takes to do it with classic worthy books make it worthwhile.  I suggest you download these.

The first of these is this outstanding classic called The Cost of Discipleship. In my humble opinion, no preacher of the Word should miss this.

Click if you want more info of this book

Here are some blurbs from Amazon that would make you realize the importance of this book.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

“When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die.” With these words, in The Cost of Discipleship, Dietrich Bonhoeffer gave powerful voice to the millions of Christians who believe personal sacrifice is an essential component of faith. Bonhoeffer, a German Lutheran pastor and theologian, was an exemplar of sacrificial faith: he opposed the Nazis from the first and was eventually imprisoned in Buchenwald and hung by the Gestapo in 1945. The Cost of Discipleship, first published in German in 1937, was Bonhoeffer’s answer to the questions, “What did Jesus mean to say to us? What is his will for us to-day?” Bonhoeffer’s answers are rooted in Lutheran grace and derived from Christian scripture (almost a third of the book consists of an extended meditation on the Sermon on the Mount). The book builds to a stunning conclusion: its closing chapter, “The Image of Christ,” describes the believer’s spiritual life as participation in Christ’s incarnation, with a rare and epigrammatic confidence: “Through fellowship and communion with the incarnate Lord,” Bonhoeffer writes, “we recover our true humanity, and at the same time we are delivered from that individualism which is the consequence of sin, and retrieve our solidarity with the whole human race.” —Michael Joseph Gross

Product Description

One of the most important theologians of the twentieth century illuminates the relationship between ourselves and the teachings of Jesus

What can the call to discipleship, the adherence to the word of Jesus, mean today to the businessman, the soldier, the laborer, or the aristocrat? What did Jesus mean to say to us? What is his will for us today? Drawing on the Sermon on the Mount, Dietrich Bonhoeffer answers these timeless questions by providing a seminal reading of the dichotomy between “cheap grace” and “costly grace.” “Cheap grace,” Bonhoeffer wrote, “is the grace we bestow on ourselves…grace without discipleship….Costly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the girl which must be asked for, the door at which a man must know….It is costly because it costs a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life.”

The Cost of Discipleship is a compelling statement of the demands of sacrifice and ethical consistency from a man whose life and thought were exemplary articulations of a new type of leadership inspired by the Gospel, and imbued with the spirit of Christian humanism and a creative sense of civic duty.

The next is one of  my favorite books on the Cross.  In our Church in Pampanga (CBC) we usually exposit one of the 50 reasons every Lord’s Supper.  It has tremendously blessed our church in so doing.  May the grace of the Cross be learned and cherished by all.

Click here for more details of this book

Happy Downloading and then Happy Listening.

A Common Calvinistic Weakness

Have you ever met a Calvinist? Well, in the first place, what is a Calvinist?  It would take a lot of words to define what a Calvinist is.  But here is a funny definition.  A Calvinist is someone who is an unconditionally elect lover of books and theological thought.

In other words, one of his weaknesses as I said in an earlier blog is: love for books.  Here is the typical one:  I was requested by a brother who is groomed by the Lord for ministry to buy books for him.  I bought him the best books I can find in the conference and here is my top pick:

Honestly, as I read it, I am so tempted not to give it, hehehe… This material is so good.  Oftentimes, when you are exposed to the theology of the Cross, you think you know enough already.  This book belies that.  Even if you know so much of the Cross, the essays here provoke deep thought and rethinking that if you are alive, there would be inevitably fresh insights.  Like fresh blood oozing out of your hands if you pierce nails thru them.

Here are partial blurbs of it:

“Here is vintage J. I. Packer accompanied by some younger friends. The magisterial but too-little-known essay ‘What Did the Cross Achieve?’ is itself worth the price of the whole book. And there is much more besides. Here, then, are gospel riches, and In My Place Condemned He Stood marks the spot where the buried treasure lies. Start digging!”
Sinclair B. Ferguson, Senior Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Columbia, South Carolina

“The essays in this volume by Packer and Dever are some of the most important things I have ever read. If you want to preach in such a way that results in real conversions and changed lives, you should master the approach to the cross laid out in this book.”
Tim Keller, Senior Pastor, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City

“This book contains some of the finest essays that have ever been written on the death of Christ.”
David F. Wells, Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

“Every student and pastor should own this volume, for the contents are so precious that they deserve more than one reading.”
Thomas R. Schreiner, Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

“Writing with the precision of learned theologians and the passion of forgiven sinners, J. I. Packer and Mark Dever explain the meaning of atonement, substitution, and propitiation-not just as words, but as saving benefits we can only receive from a crucified Savior.”
Philip Graham Ryken, Senior Minister, Tenth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia

Does Your Church Do Permission Marketing? 1

I’m currently reading this bestselling book from Seth Godin, as a help to marketing my business.

Now, Permission Marketing.  New term, eh.  I am slowly discovering nuggets of wisdom for MY business and then I thought… is this the way to do church too? Like, “customer is king” and all the other age-old principles of marketing?  No way!

Another marketing book I’m reading this time is this:

Wow, as I’m reading these two books, I’m just so flabbergasted on how some pastors are applying the principles they lay out in the present-day church!

I hope I can give you updates too, as I enjoy these and relate some theological matters to it.